Archive for February 7th, 2014

double Pin

Friday, February 7th, 2014

In the early 1920s Cartier formed a joint company with Edward Jaeger (of Jaeger- LeCoutre ) to produce movements solely for Cartier. Thus was the European watch & clock company born, although Cartier continued to use movements from other great makers. Cartier watches can be found with movements from Vancheron Constatin, Audemars-Piguet, Movado and LeCoutre I’d say my favorite classic wristwatch is the Movado Polyplan. I think it was patented or created in about 1912, and from what I understand they made them into the mid-1930s, but very few of them. I’ve owned a bunch over the years and have sold some to the Movado Museum.

Excuse me, what’s the time?” asks a passing stranger at a train station. The woman standing on the platform doesn’t glance at her wrist, but instead pulls a phone from her pocket. “Almost noon,” she says. Even though she’s wearing a watch, she’s not thinking of it as a way to tell time. With a vast array of electronic devices at our disposal—from blackberries and iphones to mp3 players and ipads—a watch is no longer a necessity. The watch’s more practical purpose of keeping time is fading as its popularity as a fashion accessory rises.

Do not be a stranger, and do not forget that shopping can be fun and not stressfull. We hope you find everything you need on our site, and we know it can be done quickly. Thank you, and see you soon. Stainless case (polished, back engraved) in good condition (a few dings on top and a period sized dot of pitting on top, 5 minute mark faded and re-drawn by hand) Original 2-tone silvered dial with 45 minute register, embossed rose gold roman numerals, and inner blue tachymeter in excellent condition

But does the fever pitch of these sales endanger what has made mechanical watches so fascinating in the first place? In contrast to these brand-driven, investment-oriented buying frenzies, Sotheby’s November auction in London features creations by George Daniels, who handcrafted watches one at a time. His creations remind us what true watchmaking is all about. It’s clear, though, that the business of serious watch collecting is here to stay. We sat down with the respected Milan-based watch connoisseur and dealer Max Bernardini for an insider’s view on collecting—and to talk about the watches of today that might become the collectibles of tomorrow. The Art of Collecting

So Rolex popularized the concept of obtaining chronometer certificates for wristwatches. Omega then started doing it with their Constellations. Patek didn’t really do it for wristwatches as far as I know. What Patek does is stamp their movements with a Geneva seal of quality. Some of them have one stamp, and some of them have two. But nobody has ever been able to explain to me the difference. It’s the same stamp. One would be like on a bridge, and one would be on the lower plate. And that just means that it met certain standards of quality production.